Quinque tabule salutationum Boncompagni
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1 Salutations sent by the pope 
1.1  Papal title for Celestine III 

1.2  .P., emperor 
           
(with a note on titles of empresses) 
1.3  Philipp Augustus, king of France 
           
(with a note on the title of the king of Jerusalem) 
1.4  Isaac II Angelos Romeon, Byzantine emperor 
1.5  Richard I, king of England 
1.6  the king of Sicily 
           
(with a note on titles of other kings) 
1.7  patriarchs (Grado) and archbishops (Milan) 
           
(with a note on titles of legates and primates) 
1.8 (note on the appellations "venerable frater" and "dilectus filius" in papal salutations) 
1.9  .A., archbishop of Mainz and cardinal bishop of S. Sabina 
1.10  .A., cardinal-bishop of Verona 
1.11  Johannes Lombardus, bishop of Viterbo and cardinal priest of S. Clemente 
1.12  Melior, cardinal priest of SS Giovanni e Paolo (1185-1197) 
           
(with a note on titles of cardinal legates) 
1.13  Gerardus Scambecchi, bishop of Bologna and Ardizius, bishop of Modena 
1.14  Rodolphus, prior of S. Victor's of Bologna and .?. prior of S. Maria de Reno (Bologna) 
1.15  .M., abbot of S. Proculi (Bologna) and Rodolphus, prior of S. Victor's of Bologna 
           
(note on the term "titulus") 
1.16  [Pandulfus], cardinal priest of SS. XII Apostoli 
1.17  Petrus Capuanus, cardinal deacon of S. Maria in Via Lata 
1.18  .P., abbot of Nonantula 
1.19  .G., master 
1.20  .M., abbess of S. Barbatiani 
1.21  .M., duke of Saxony 
1.22  .A., nobleman from Mugello 
1.23  Matilda, countess of Tuscany 
1.24  the consuls of Florence 
1.25  the (excommunicated) consuls of Trani 
           
(with an exordium explaining the denial of a salutation) 
1.26  .A. and .B., sons of Saladin, king of the Saracens or to Massamuto 
           
(with an exordium explaining the omisssion of a salutation) 

1.27  Pope always placed first in salutations 
           
(with a note on contrary usage found in the Decretum) 
1.28  Avoiding prolixity in salutations 
1.29  Two definitions of the salutation 
1.30  Oral and written salutations 
1.31  Verbs to avoid in salutations; denial or omission of salutations 
1.32  Avoidance of factual narration in salutations, contrary to example of Pauline epistles 
1.33  Functional-organologic metaphor of the parts of a letter 

2 Salutations sent to the pope  
2.1 Prologue 

2.2 Henry VI, emperor 
           
(imperial salutation as exemplary for all lower persons) 
2.3  an indignant Henry VI, emperor 
           
(with a note on titles of empresses) 
2.4  Ysaac Angelus Romeon, Byzantine emperor 
           
(with a note on salutations of queens) 
2.5  .I., patriarch of Antioch 
           
(patriarchal salutations as exemplary for lower clerics, and on humility appellations) 
2.6  Henry de Marcy, abbot of Clairvaux [and cardinal bishop of Albano] 
           
(more on humility appellations, and the title "archimandritas" used for Greek abbots) 
2.7  Peter, bishop of Florence 
2.8  (a note on the need for notaries to know the local customs) 
2.9  Henry, duke of Saxony 
2.10  the consuls of Verona 
2.11  .A., nobleman of Mugello 
           
(with a note on vassals of the lands of St. Peter) 
2.12  Matilda, countess of Tuscany 
2.13  countess Gualdrada, the wife of count Guido Guerra and M., daughter of B. of Corzano 
2.14  common folk and serfs 

2.15  Varieties of modes of salutation to be found in this table, applicable for those writing to greater persons, and especially for ecclesiastics 
2.16  The (frivolous) opinion of some, that a salutation must contain the word "salus". 
2.17  Another silly opinion held by some, that when the recipients name is written in the accusative, a verb "the pope desires" or "wishes salvation and apostolic blessing" should be understood.  Boncompagno says that recipients should not be put in the accusative, and that the verb should be understood to be "the pope orders" or "sends salvation and apostolic blessing". 
2.18  Restrictions and refinements about the verbs to be understood in imperial salutations, and about the salutation itself. 
2.19  Distinction between verba missiva and desiderativa

3  Salutations of imperors and kings 
3.1  Prologue 

3.2  Henry VI, emperor, to Philipp Augustus, king of France; Henry VI, emperor, to Cnut, king of Denmark.  (with note on titles used in imperial letters to the Byzantine emperor and to imperial vassals)
3.3  Philipp Augustus, king of France, to Henry VI, emperor.  
3.4  Isaac Romeon, Byzantine emperor, to Henry VI, emperor.  (denigrating salutation)
3.5  Henry VI, emperor to Constance, empress (and vice versa)
3.6  (wives should honor their husbands)
3.7  
3.8  
3.9  
3.10  
3.11  
3.12  
3.13  
3.14  
3.15  
3.16 

 
4.1  
4.2  
4.3  
4.4  
4.5  
4.6  
4.7  
4.8  
4.9  
4.10  
4.11  
4.12  
4.13  
4.14  
4.15  
4.16  
4.17  
4.18  
4.19  
4.20  
4.21  
4.22  
4.23  
4.24  
4.25  
4.26  
4.27  
4.28  
4.29  
4.30  
4.31  
4.32  
4.33  
4.34  
4.35  
4.36  
4.37  
4.38  
4.39  
4.40  
4.41  
4.42  
4.43  
4.44 

5  Salutations for secular men and women 
5.1  Prologue 

5.2  Henry, duke of Saxony to R., duke of Austria 
5.3  Petrus Ziani, duke of Venice, Dalmatia and Croatia and lord of three quarters of the the whole Byzantine empire (no recipient); Raimond, duke of Narbonne, count of Toulouse and marquise of Provence. 
5.4  Henry, duke of Saxony to the consuls and people of Verona 
5.5  (a note on the titles of imperial legates, and on the distinction between legatus and preses) 
5.6  (more on the distinction between legatus and preses) 
5.7  A. and B. senators of Rome to the consuls and people of Viterbo 
5.8  Roman senators and prefects should place their names before all other recipients, except for the pope, emperor and empress, and kings and queens.   Urbs refers to Rome alone as a proper noun. 
5.9  These honors of precedence accorded to Rome despite its fall. 
5.10  Henry, duke of Saxony to the nobleman .A. of Mugello; Henry duke of Saxony to his vassal .B. of Corzano. 
5.11  The consuls and people of Bologna to Henry, duke of Saxony 
5.12  (Salutations used by vassals) 
5.13  
5.14  
5.15  
5.16  
5.17  
5.18  
5.19  
5.20  
5.21  
5.22  
5.23  
5.24  
5.25  
5.26  
5.27  
5.28  
5.29  
5.30  
5.31  
5.32  
5.33  
5.34  
5.35  
5.36  
5.37  
5.38 

***
© Steven M. Wight, Los Angeles 1998

Scrineum © Universitą di Pavia 1999